Monthly Archives: June 2015

Jasamine Young-Paulhill, UEP X, Named Ruth J. Simmons Scholar

JasamineJasamine Young-Paulhill was named the 2015 winner and the fourth recipient of the Ruth Simmons Urban Education Policy Scholarship. This full-tuition award is granted annually by the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University to the UEP student who most epitomizes the former Brown University president’s commitment to education equity and social justice.

Young-Paulhill, a Philadelphia native, is a 2014 graduate of Oberlin College, with a BA in Hispanic Studies and Creative Writing. During the 2014-2015 academic year, she served with City Year Chicago as the extended learning time coordinator on her team, working to improve the daily attendance, academic performance, and social-emotional skills of 20–40 at-risk students on a daily basis. While at Oberlin, she was an America Reads tutor site leader for students in grades 3–5.

Read more about Jasamine and the Ruth J. Simmons Urban Education Policy Scholarship here.

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UEP Professor Matthew Kraft in the News!

Yet again, Urban Education Policy Professor Matthew Kraft’s research is making headlines!  In this past week, his work on “The Underutilized Potential of Teacher-to-Parent Communication: Evidence from a Field Experiment” has been featured in The Boston Globe, and Education Week.   The study, which is co-authored by Todd Rogers, director of Harvard’s Student Social Support R&D Lab, is set for publication in the August 2015 issue of the academic journal Economics of Education Review.

Read the entire paper today, or check out the abstract below:


We study an intervention designed to increase the effectiveness of parental involvement in their children’s education. Each week we sent brief individualized messages from teachers to the parents of high school students in a credit recovery program. This light-touch communication increased the probability students earned credits by 6.5 percentage points – a 41% reduction in the proportion failing to earn credit. This improvement resulted primarily from preventing drop-outs, rather than from reducing failure or dismissal rates. The intervention shaped the content of parent-child conversations with messages emphasizing what students could improve, versus what students were doing well, producing the largest effects. Our results illustrate the underutilized potential of communication policies with clear but reasonable expectations for teachers and program designs that make communication efficient and effective.