Category Archives: Urban Education Program

PPSD Superintendent Addresses UEP XII Cohort

On Wednesday, June 28, our 12th Brown University Urban Education Policy cohort gathered at the Providence Biltmore for a UEP dinner featuring keynote remarks by Providence Public School District Superintendent Chris Maher.

lovely view from the UEP dinner at Providence Biltmore

UEP Program Director Kenneth Wong

Superintendent Maher provided a candid overview of the state of Providence public schools Continue reading

2017 Brown Urban Education Policy Conference

On May 16, 2017, the Brown University Urban Education Policy Master’s Program held its annual conference, featuring presentations of the work of the internships of 23 UEP students (a 24th in spirit from the maternity ward!) related to creating, supporting, and sustaining an equitable education system. UEP-Conference1

The day began with opening remarks by Dr. Kenneth Wong, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Professor of Education Policy and Chair of the Department of Education.

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Panel 1 (“Involving Diverse Stakeholders To Build Student Agency and Civic Capacity”) was moderated by Professor Andrea Flores and featured UEP student panelists Melanie Bowdish, Maureen Dizon, Rebecca Lessard, Jeanine Mason, Sabrina Uribe-Ruggiero, and Kunal Vasudev. Teach for America Alumna Kristine Frech served as the panel discussant.

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Panel 2 (“Assessing and Monitoring Conditions for Student Success”) was moderated by Professor John Papay and featured UEP student panelists Sam Ashley, Dalma Diaz, Martin Quirk, Michael Ricci, Kelly Rosiles-Villagomez, and Chun Wu. Mateus Baptista from the office of the Mayor of Newark, New Jersey served as the panel discussant.

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Tom Flanagan, Chief Academic Officer of the Providence Public School District, provided an engaging keynote speech during the lunch portion of the conference, providing his own perspective on education equity.

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Panel 3 (“Ensuring Equitable Opportunities to Improve Outcomes for All Learners”) was moderated by Professor Michael Grady and featured UEP student panelists Madalyn Ciampi, Briana Jimenez, Evert Justice Finger, Emily Lysaght, Karina Rodriguez, and Harkaran Uppal. Brown UEP alumna and Harvard Ed.D. candidate Heather Johnson served as the panel discussant.

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Panel 4 (“Supporting Positive School Culture”) was moderated by Professor Matthew Kraft and featured UEP student panelists Megan Baker, Donald Kost, Ariel Neumann, Erica Prenda, Rebecca Salzman- Fiske, and John Sharrott. Kirtley Fisher, Performance Management Executive at the Rhode Island Department of Education, served as the panel discussant.

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Site supervisors, colleagues, and friends of the 23 presenters learned about fascinating internship projects, many that will continue to be pursued in months and years to come, by Brown UEP students at sites in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Jersey, California, Illinois, Washington, D.C., ,and India.

The Brown Department of Education congratulates all of our Urban Education Policy master’s program students for their wonderful work and presentations!

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UEP Alumna Branta Lockett ’16 in BEST Program

Branta Lockett

Branta Lockett

The Brown Education Department would like to share an interview given to the Brown Graduate School by Branta Lockett, AM ’16, about her experience in the Brown Executive Scholars Training (BEST) program. BEST, established in 2010, is designed to expose doctoral and advanced master’s degree students to careers in higher education administration. Every fall, eight to 10 graduate students are chosen to participate in this 12-week mentored, education and training program, which is sponsored by the Graduate School and the Office of Institutional Diversity.

 

How did you hear about the BEST program? What made you want to apply?
I initially heard about the BEST program while attending Admit Day in March 2016. During this event Dr. Wong, Chair of the Education department, mentioned that several of the Urban Education Policy students participated in the BEST program and had great experiences. I decided to apply to the BEST program because I wanted to learn more about higher education administration. In particular, I wanted to learn how administrators can use their positions to help create environments that support the success of marginalized students at a university.

How has or how will this program help you in your career or studies after Brown?
This program will help me in my career because it exposed me to different leadership styles. I learned practical skills that I can use in professional settings.

Did you already have a career plan in mind? Has this program influenced you in any way to change/alter it?
Before participating in the BEST program, I considered a career in higher education administration. The BEST program convinced me to continue pursuing my interests in higher education administration and to even start looking for jobs that combine higher education administration with education policy, which is what I studied at Brown.

Who was your administrative sponsor and what did you learn or enjoy about working with him or her?
Dr. Gail Cohee was my administrative sponsor. I enjoyed speaking with her about her position [as Director of the Sarah Doyle Women’s Center and Associate Dean of the College] and how she uses her administrative role to help improve the experiences of students at Brown University. I also enjoyed learning about her career path to becoming a senior administrator.

What piece of advice provided by the speakers resonated most with you?
Dr. Liza Cariaga-Lo, Vice President for Academic Development, Diversity and Inclusion, gave us great advice for how to manage encounters with students and faculty who are upset or distressed about a given situation. She explained to us that the person is most likely upset because they are really passionate about the situation. Therefore, it is important to not only listen to their concerns but to really try to understand their perspectives and consider those perspectives as you try to help them resolve their concerns. Administrative work is demanding but it is important to honor how others feel and let them know that you care while also remembering not to take their criticisms personally. This is practical advice that is useful for working with people in any setting. 

Nora Gordon Kicks Off Fall 2016 Education Department Speaker Series

On Thursday, Sept. 22, students, faculty and staff gathered over lunch in the Barus Building Dewey Conference Room for the first of the Department of Education’s four-part fall semester speaker series. Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy Associate Professor Nora Gordon kicked off the series with her dynamic presentation, “Medicaid, Special Education, and Children’s Access to Health Services.”

Education Dept. Chair Kenneth Wong and Dr. Nora Gordon

Education Dept. Chair Kenneth Wong and Dr. Nora Gordon

Dr. Gordon, a research associate of the National Bureau of Education Research and an expert on Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, has been studying school-based Medicaid billing for special education and trends in how states use categorical versus general aid for education. Looking around the room at various student teachers, she shared her excitement at talking about the project with people who have spent more time in schools than she has, then jokingly answered a query on how she balances teaching, research, advisory panels, and raising three kids (the secret to her success: an 8:30 p.m. bedtime). Then she briefed the audience on how in 1988 Congress authorized Medicaid to reimburse for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)-related services for children with special education needs. She had been surprised to learn just how large the Medicaid program is for school-aged children. Continue reading

Alumni Alert: UEP ’13 Mike Katz In the News!

Mike KatzThe Urban Education Policy program works to provide each student with valuable technical skills and enhanced perspectives to help advance future careers. As a tight-knit program, we remain closely connected with our alumni and enjoy celebrating their successes! We recently heard from a graduate who is working to accelerate the dialogue around early childhood absenteeism in Washington D.C.:

Mike Katz, UEP ’13, now works for the Urban Institute and helped lead recent research with D.C. Public Schools on pre-kindergarten absenteeism. The study involved two components, both focusing on the Head Start program. Mike’s work explored contributing factors to absenteeism and potential solutions, and culminated with the report Insights into Absenteeism in DCPS Early Childhood Programs: Contributing Factors and Promising Strategies. The work also analyzed attendance data, patterns, and trends for Head Start students in a separate report Title I schools, Absenteeism in DC Public Schools Early Education Program.

The two reports have received considerable media attention, including an NPR radio interview with Mike. The Washington Post and Education Week also ran stories on the work, (one of which was tweeted out by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan)!

Please join us in celebrating the work Mike Katz and his colleagues have accomplished by reading up on this interesting and important topic!

Welcoming UEP IX

UEP orientation tour

UEP IX students tour campus during orientation

Yesterday was the first day of the summer semester for UEP IX! We welcomed twenty five students to campus who will be joining us for summer coursework with our professors at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform. Throughout the day, students heard from faculty, staff, and representatives from other University offices about their upcoming year. During lunch, UEP students met fellow graduate students in the department’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program through an activity planned by recent MAT and UEP alumni. We look forward to learning more about UEP IX in the months to come!

Professor John Papay Publishes Paper on Boston Teacher Residency

Does an Urban Teacher Residency Increase Student Achievement? Early Evidence From Boston

Boston Teacher Residency (BTR) is an innovative practice-based preparation program in which candidates work alongside a mentor teacher for a year before becoming a teacher of record in the Boston Public Schools (BPS). The authors found that BTR graduates are more racially diverse than other BPS novices, more likely to teach math and science, and more likely to remain teaching in the district through Year 5. Initially, BTR graduates for whom value-added performance data are avail- able are no more effective at raising student test scores than other novice teachers in English lan- guage arts and less effective in math. The effectiveness of BTR graduates in math improves rapidly over time, however, such that by their 4th and 5th years they outperform veteran teachers. Simulations of the program’s overall effect through retention and effectiveness suggest that it is likely to improve student achievement in the district only modestly over the long run.

Read the full paper here Papay West Fullerton Kane – EEPA – Final Published

UEP Fall Open House Itinerary

Prospective students: Below is the Itinerary for UEP Fall Open House! We hope you can join us to learn more about the UEP program from faculty, alumni and current UEP students. Please RSVP athttps://docs.google.com/a/brown.edu/spreadsheet/viewform?fromEmail=true&formkey=dEZydFVuemZXZS1sMDhSNFhIbnFzVXc6MQOpen House Intinerary